The Supreme Court recently agreed to decide the legal battle between Google and Oracle that has been going on for a decade. At issue is whether Oracle can copyright the JAVA application programming interface ("API") that Google used in early versions of Android, which has become the world's most-used mobile operating system.  Simplistically, APIs are interpreters that allow software programs written in different languages to communicate - i.e. they allow Facebook, Twitter, Uber, etc. to talk to your smartphone's operating system.  

Google has argued that the APIs aren't copyrightable, relying on long-established law that states you can't copyright the written description of a method for doing something, where the protection for a method of doing something is the proper realm of a patent rather than a copyright.  Twice now the Federal Circuit has overturned district trials, finding that APIs are copyrightable. 

See https://www.newsweek.com/2019/06/07/google-oracle-copyright-case-supreme-court-1433037.html for good background that has the software and tech industries, and many others on the edges of their seats for this case that has far-reaching implications on software valuations.